#9 The Good Art of Bad People

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In light of the prominence of sexual assault allegations against artists, art historian Lane Eagles joins Dustyn and Whitney as they navigate the difficult question: how does our relationship to art change when we know its creator did bad things? Are we allowed to enjoy the works? Are we allowed to purchase them?

Sources

Amanda Hess. “How the Myth of the Artistic Genius Excuses the Abuse of Women.” The New York Times, November 10, 2017.

Caitlin Thompson. “Roxane Gay: The Bad Feminist’s Guide to Enjoying Hip Hop.” WNYC.

Chuck Klosterman. “On Boycotting Woody Allen’s Films.” The New York Times, March 14, 2014.

Justin Weinberg. “Philosophers On The Art of Morally Troubling Artists.” Daily Nous, November 21, 2017.

Kate Harding. “Letters From Hollywood: Roman Polanski’s Rape Of Child No Big Thing.” Jezebel. Accessed November 9, 2017.

Melena Ryzik, Cara Buckley, and Jodi Kantor. “Louis C.K. Crossed a Line Into Sexual Misconduct, 5 Women Say.” The New York Times, November 9, 2017.

Noël Carroll. “Art and Ethical Criticism: An Overview of Recent Directions of Research.” Ethics 110, no. 2 (2000): 350–87.

Roxane Gay. “Compartmentalizing Woody Allen: What America Chooses Not to See.” Salon, February 2, 2014.

Saturday Night Live. Welcome to Hell - SNL. 

Further Reading

Ann Hornaday, “Louis C.K., male accountability and the year fans were forced to grow up.” Washington Post, 2017

Charles McGrath, “Good Art, Bad People”. New York Times, 2012.

Claire Dederer, “What do we do with the art of monstrous men?” Paris Review, 2017

Cody Delistraty, “How Picasso Bled the Women in His Life for Art”. Paris Review, 2017